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This website contains the story behind the world’s best ” interceptor”  and “deep interdiction” fighter. 

There are numerous great site’s about the F-15 so why another site? Well most site are great photo gallery’s and contain the history and development of the F-15. What they miss is the story behind the F-15. The training, exercises and Operations. The history of the squadrons that operate or haven flown with the F-15.

An F-15C Eagle from the 122nd Fighter Squadron, assigned to the 122nd Fighter Wing, Louisiana Air National Guard, takes off during Red Flag 16-4 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Aug. 24, 2016. Red Flag 16-4 conducted exercise missions to train pilots in a highly contested environment with coalition partners. (U. S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Frank Miller)

An F-15C Eagle from the 122nd Fighter Squadron, assigned to the 122nd Fighter Wing, Louisiana Air National Guard, takes off during Red Flag 16-4 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Aug. 24, 2016. Red Flag 16-4 conducted exercise missions to train pilots in a highly contested environment with coalition partners. (U. S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Frank Miller)

It is a site that is far from complete, so any contributions like Stories, Info etc. is more than welcome. Please contact the webmaster via the “contact me” page.

Each squadron history page is different from the other. Such as the 461 FS which contains a whole lot of extra information about the development of the F-15E. Take a look for yourself, and I hope you enjoy it.

SOUTHWEST ASIA - An F-15 Eagle taxis prior to a training sortie Feb. 22, 2012. The 44th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, deployed from Kadena Air Base, Japan, flies with the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing in Southwest Asia. Their mission is both deterrence as part of the defense of the Arabian Gulf, and training with partners in the region. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Arian Nead)

SOUTHWEST ASIA – An F-15 Eagle taxis prior to a training sortie Feb. 22, 2012. The 44th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, deployed from Kadena Air Base, Japan, flies with the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing in Southwest Asia. Their mission is both deterrence as part of the defense of the Arabian Gulf, and training with partners in the region. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Arian Nead)

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Chiefs take off for Razor Talon

Capt. Bowman (right), 335th Fighter Squadron pilot, and 1st Lt. Kaiser, 335th FS weapon systems officer, check over the maintenance log of an F-15E Strike Eagle during exercise Razor Talon, May 11, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly, large-force training exercise for joint East Coast tactical and support aviation units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

Two Airmen from the 372nd Training Squadron, Detachment 1, marshal an F-15E Strike Eagle during exercise Razor Talon, May 11, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. This monthly, large-force training exercise, gives service members unique opportunities to combine land, air and sea forces from all service branches in realistic training environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

An F-15E Strike Eagle takes off during exercise Razor Talon, May 11, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly, large-force training exercise for joint East Coast tactical and support aviation units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

492 Fighter Squadron at INIOHOS 18

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England takes off from Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. The 492nd FS is flying alongside Hellenic Air Force airmen and other partners and Allies during the exercise to increase interoperability and strengthen partnerships. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

Two F-15E Strike Eagles assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England approach the runway at Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. Thirteen 492nd FS F-15Es are participating in the Hellenic Air Force-led multinational exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England flies over Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. INIOHOS 18 is a Hellenic Air Force-led, large force flying exercise focused on strengthening partnerships and interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England takes off from Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. The 492nd FS is flying alongside Hellenic Air Force airmen and other partners and Allies during the exercise to increase interoperability and strengthen partnerships. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England prepares to land at Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. Seventy-six fighter aircraft are participating in this years’ iteration of the exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

Two F-15E Strike Eagles assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England taxis at Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. Thirteen 492nd Fighter Squadron F-15Es are participating in the Hellenic Air Force-led multinational exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England taxis at Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. INIOHOS 18 is a Hellenic Air Force-led, large force flying exercise focused on strengthening partnerships and interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

F-15 Training Mission at Klamath Falls

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Eric Haas, 173rd Fighter Wing F-15 pilot, steps to the flightline in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

U.S. Air Force F-15C maintainers prepare the jets for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

An F-15C student pilot, starts up the engines of an F-15 Eagle in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

U.S. Air Force F-15C pilots preflight their aircraft in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

An F-15 crew chief signals the pilot that chalks had been pulled on the tires in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C student pilot steps to the flightline in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

An F-15 crew chief stands at parade rest as the pilot continues his preflight checks in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

335th FS takes off for Razor Talon

By Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes, 4th Fighter Wing Public Affairs / Published April 06, 2018

1st Lts. Jacob Del Ponte (left), 336th Fighter Squadron pilot, and Shane O’Connell, 335th Fighter Squadron weapon systems officer, check the maintenance log of an F-15E Strike Eagle prior to take off for Razor Talon, April 6, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly, large-force training exercise for joint East Coast tactical and support aviation units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

Airman Justin Fralick, 4th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, completes final checks before launching an F-15E Strike Eagle for Razor Talon, April 6, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. This monthly, large-force training exercise, gives service members unique opportunities to combine land, air and sea forces from all service branches in realistic training environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

An F-15E Strike Eagle from the 335th Fighter Squadron takes off to participate in Razor Talon, April 6, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly low-cost, large-force training exercise for joint East Coast tactical and support aviation units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

An F-15E Strike Eagle takes off to participate in Razor Talon while another F-15E taxis down the runway, April 6, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly, large-force training exercise for joint East Coast tactical and support aviation units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

Two F-15E Strike Eagles from the 335th Fighter Squadron taxi down the runway to participate in Razor Talon, April 6, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly large-force training exercise that involves friendly forces fighting through contested airspace while destroying air-to-air and air-to-ground simulated threats along the North Carolina cost and Mid-Atlantic region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

391st FS participates in Combat Archer, Hammer

By Staff Sgt. Jeremy L. Mosier, 366th Fighter Wing Public Affairs / Published April 03, 2018

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho — The 391st Fighter Squadron departed for Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, to participate in Combat Archer and Hammer March 25, 2018.

Amn Tasha Trainor, 391st Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, parks an F-15E Strike Eagle April 2, 2018 at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. Exercise Combat Archer and Hammer provide an opportunity to evaluate a unit’s capability to employ a variety of weapon systems throughout all stages of the process, from storage and preparation, to use on target. (Staff Sgt. Jeremy L. Mosier)

391st Fighter Squadron members perform a FOD walk before take-offs at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, April 3, 2018. The 391st FS participated in exercises Combat Archer and Hammer. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt Jeremy L. Mosier)

These exercises provide aircrew and maintainers from the 366th Fighter Wing an opportunity to evaluate their ability to employ a variety weapons systems throughout all stages of the process.

“Exercises like Combat Archer and Hammer give us an idea of how a missile performs,” said Capt. Zachary Zimmerman, 391st Fighter Squadron flight commander. “Also, they help build confidence in the weapon system and the aircraft itself, so when a munition comes off a jet in combat we know exactly how it is going to perform.”

During these exercises units improve efficiency of deploying a variety of munitions, to include the AIM9X.

A 391st Fighter Squadron F-15E Strike Eagle takes off from Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, during Combat Archer and Hammer April 2, 2018. Exercises Combat Archer and Hammer provide aircrew and maintainers the opportunity to evaluate their ability to employ a variety of different munitions. (Staff Sgt. Jeremy L. Mosier)

Although aircrew and maintainers work with the loading and employing of munitions at home station, Combat Archer and Hammer provide the opportunity to work with larger quantities of live munitions in a short period of time.

“These exercises allow us to evaluate our complete kill chain of a weapon system,” said Lt. Col. Robert Olvis, 391st Fighter Squadron commander. “Being able to go from our munitions troops who build the weapons, to the maintainers who load the weapons, to testing the actual combat system itself to include the aviators who go out and employ those weapons.”

58 TFS returing from Operation Desert Storm 1991

A blast from the past, some photo material of the might Gorilla’s returning from Operations Desert Storm. More info on the 58th Fighter Squadron can be found on the squadron page.

Razor Talon prepares 4th FW to lead Red Flag

By Staff Sgt. Michael Charles, 4th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

F-15E Strike Eagle fighter jets assigned to the 335th Fighter Squadron, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, prepare for takeoff during Red Flag 18-1, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Jan. 30, 2018. Red Flag gives mission commanders the opportunity to lead in a contested, degraded and operationally limited environment limited environment with multi-domain assets. (U.S Air Force photo by Lawrence Crespo)

To maintain its status as one of the nation’s most capable response forces and a vital arm for combatant commanders, the wing continuously trains for the operations of today and the conflicts of tomorrow.

Each month, the 4th FW hosts Exercise Razor Talon. This large-force exercise takes place within the East Coast Battlespace, located in Northeastern North Carolina on Dare County Bombing Range and over portions of the Atlantic Ocean, and it serves to prepare joint units for world-wide combat deployments.

Even in its infancy, Razor Talon brought a new dynamic to tactical and strategic training on the East Coast, while also preparing the wing to take a lead role in combat and readiness operations.

Although only a single-day exercise, Razor Talon acts as a pivotal training mechanism for new aircrew members to practice interoperability from their own installation while giving them the skills needed to lead larger and more complex missions in Exercise Red Flag at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. In fact, the 4th FW was selected as the lead wing for Red Flag 18-1, from Jan. 26 to Feb. 16.

“Red Flag and Razor Talon are essential opportunities to prepare our Airmen for the integrated multi-domain combat operations of the future,” said Col. Richard Dickens, RF 18-1 Air Expeditionary Wing commander. “While the size, scope, and terrain may be different, both exercises focus on challenging combat scenarios that enable us to improve the lethality of our aircrew.”

Operated by the 414th Combat Training Squadron, Red Flag is a realistic combat training exercise involving the air, space, and cyber forces of the United States and its allies. The exercise is hosted north of Las Vegas on the Nevada Test and Training Range, the U.S. Air Force’s premier military training area with more than 15,000 square miles of airspace and 2.9 million acres of land.

Col. Michael Mathes, 414th CTS commander, articulated that Red Flag 18-1 is the largest Red Flag to date by number of participants and includes units from the U.S. Air Force, Navy, Army, and Marine Corps as well as the Royal Australian Air Force and the United Kingdom’s Royal Air Force. He also highlighted this exercise as having a unique balance of training efficiency with mission effectiveness.

“Red Flag 18-1 primarily is a strike package focused training venue that we integrate at a command and control level in support of joint task force operations,” said Mathes. “It’s a lot of words to say that we integrate every capability we can into strike operations that are flown out of Nellis Air Force Base.”

Established in 1975, as one of the initiatives directed by Gen. Robert J. Dixon, then commander of Tactical Air Command, the exercise’s original intent was to maximize the combat readiness, capability, and survivability of participating units by providing realistic training in air-to-air combat. It has since grown to include ground, space, cyber, and electronic attack threats.

“Red Flag remains a great mix of heritage and future potential,” said Mathes. “We are very proud of our heritage with the way that Red Flag had improved survivability and readiness over the years. We look forward as we continue to grow readiness through integrated training as well as improving training efficiency.”

According to Maj. Caleb Edmondson, a weapon systems officer from the 335th Fighter Squadron, the exercise continues to challenge the way aircrew members approach various scenarios and helps to increase the adaptability skills of all those who participate.

“The complex simulated threats of Red Flag and the Nevada Test and Training Range offer an experience that we currently can’t replicate at any other range in the nation, including the East Coast Battlespace,” Edmondson said. “If you add this experience to that received in our Razor Talon exercise, you are essentially giving aircrew members the experience to provide adaptable and flexible interoperability no matter the terrain or the threat.”

Fundamental similarities between Red Flag and Razor Talon act as a bridging point to what Airmen assigned to the 4th FW learn while at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base and help reinforce best practices while operating in a contested, degraded, and operationally-limited environment.

Both exercises tactically and operationally integrate U.S. and coalition force assets to overcome various combat scenarios across all domains of warfare. As the lead wing, it is the 4th FW’s responsibility to take an active role in integrating all Red Flag 18-1 participants.

Each emphasis that both exercises place on mission planning, execution, and debrief is a main factor in ensuring both air and ground crews are tested to the maximum extent of their readiness capabilities, while also providing a forum for a free exchange of ideas between forces.

The scenarios involve friendly forces fighting their way into contested airspace while trying to destroy air-to-air and surface-to-air threats in a planned and time sensitive manner. Their aim is to also reinforce interoperability among allies across air, space, and cyberspace domains.

“This is an opportunity to improve our processes in a unique, robust, and fast-paced training environment,” Dickens said. “Exercises like Red Flag and Razor Talon allow our Airmen at the 4th Fighter Wing and throughout the Air Force to grow into tactical leaders while we train to meet our current threats and potential future adversaries.”

 

366th Fighter Wing night operations

By Airman 1st Class Jeremy Wolff , 366th Fighter Wing Public Affairs 

F-15E Strike Eagles from the 389th and 391st Fighter Squadrons executed night sorties in support of exercise Gunslinger 18-4. The exercise tested personnel and units in their ability to support a contingency response to an adversarial threat here on base or in an expeditionary capacity across the globe.

The wing executed multiple scenarios that tested the techniques associated with chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives (CBRNE) response; security forces tactics and base defense measures; and Self Air Buddy Care (SABC) and mass-casualty medical training, to name a few.

F-15E Strike Eagles sit on the flightline during an exercise, Feb. 8, 2018, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise focused on training for potential real world contingencies.

An F-15E Strike Eagle prepares to taxi during an exercise Feb. 8, 2018, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise focused on training for potential real world contingencies.

An F-15E Strike Eagle prepares to taxi during an exercise Feb. 8, 2018, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise focused on training for potential real world contingencies.

An F-15E Strike Eagle prepares to taxi during an exercise Feb. 8, 2018, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise focused on training for potential real world contingencies.

An F-15E Strike Eagle prepares to taxi during an exercise Feb. 8, 2018, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise focused on training for potential real world contingencies.

An F-15E Strike Eagle prepares to taxi during an exercise Feb. 8, 2018, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise focused on training for potential real world contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jeremy D. Wolff)

An F-15E Strike Eagle takes off during an exercise, Feb. 8, 2018, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The exercise focused on training for potential real world contingencies.

12th Tactical Fighter Squadron

The Dirty Dozen, commanded by Lt. Col. R.D. Copp. Can anyone help with the identification? Please contact me on eagle@skytrailer.com

 

493 FS ” Gold before dawn”

493rd Fighter Squadron F-15C Eagle takes off at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Jan. 9. The F-15C Eagle is an all-weather tactical fighter designed to help the Air Force maintain air supremacy. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)

 

A 493rd Fighter Squadron F-15C Eagle takes off at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Jan. 9. The 493rd FS’s continued presence has enabled regular participation in exercises and other operational engagements in the region, reassuring partners and allies of the U.S.’s commitment to European security and stability. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)

A 493rd Fighter Squadron F-15C Eagle takes off at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Jan. 9. The F-15C Eagle is an all-weather tactical fighter designed to help the Air Force maintain air supremacy. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)

A 493rd Fighter Squadron F-15C Eagle takes off at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Jan. 9. The design of the weapons and flight control systems on the one-seater fighter aircraft allow the pilot to safely and effectively perform air-to-air combat without a co-pilot. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)

A 493rd Fighter Squadron F-15C Eagle takes off at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, Jan. 9. The 493rd FS recently returned from Siauliai Air Base, Lithuania, after supporting the 45th rotation of NATO’s Baltic Air Policing mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Abby L. Finkel)