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This website contains the story behind the world’s best ” interceptor”  and “deep interdiction” fighter. 

There are numerous great site’s about the F-15 so why another site? Well most site are great photo gallery’s and contain the history and development of the F-15. What they miss is the story behind the F-15. The training, exercises and Operations. The history of the squadrons that operate or haven flown with the F-15.

An F-15C Eagle from the 122nd Fighter Squadron, assigned to the 122nd Fighter Wing, Louisiana Air National Guard, takes off during Red Flag 16-4 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Aug. 24, 2016. Red Flag 16-4 conducted exercise missions to train pilots in a highly contested environment with coalition partners. (U. S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Frank Miller)

An F-15C Eagle from the 122nd Fighter Squadron, assigned to the 122nd Fighter Wing, Louisiana Air National Guard, takes off during Red Flag 16-4 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Aug. 24, 2016. Red Flag 16-4 conducted exercise missions to train pilots in a highly contested environment with coalition partners. (U. S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Frank Miller)

It is a site that is far from complete, so any contributions like Stories, Info etc. is more than welcome. Please contact the webmaster via the “contact me” page.

Each squadron history page is different from the other. Such as the 461 FS which contains a whole lot of extra information about the development of the F-15E. Take a look for yourself, and I hope you enjoy it.

SOUTHWEST ASIA - An F-15 Eagle taxis prior to a training sortie Feb. 22, 2012. The 44th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, deployed from Kadena Air Base, Japan, flies with the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing in Southwest Asia. Their mission is both deterrence as part of the defense of the Arabian Gulf, and training with partners in the region. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Arian Nead)

SOUTHWEST ASIA – An F-15 Eagle taxis prior to a training sortie Feb. 22, 2012. The 44th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, deployed from Kadena Air Base, Japan, flies with the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing in Southwest Asia. Their mission is both deterrence as part of the defense of the Arabian Gulf, and training with partners in the region. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Arian Nead)

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Rocketeer reaches 3K flying hours

By Tech. Sgt. David W. Carbajal, 4th Fighter Wing Public Affairs / Published June 11, 2018

Four months is the amount of time the 336th Fighter Squadron commander has spent in the cockpit throughout his near 16-year flying career.

Lt. Col. Matthew Swanson (left), 336th Fighter Squadron commander, takes a picture with his family and friend with his certificate of completion for reaching 3,000 flying-hours in the F-15E Strike Eagle, June 11, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Family and friends celebrated Swanson’s milestone after landing during a routine flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

Lt. Col. Matthew Swanson reached the rare 3,000 flight-hours milestone in the F-15E Strike Eagle during a flight here June 11, 2018.

He was greeted by his family, fellow pilots and squadron members to congratulate him on his achievement.

“Three thousand hours is an incredible accomplishment for any fighter pilot,” said Col. Christopher Sage, 4th Fighter Wing commander. “Only a rare few make it to this milestone, but he’s shown to have the commitment to go even further.”

According to Boeing, Swanson is the 37th F-15E fighter pilot to eclipse that feat.

“It’s very humbling to be among the 3,000 flight-hour company,” said Swanson. “But, honestly, I’m the guy benefiting from the outstanding maintainers and support that we receive every day. They are the ones who deserve the credit.”

He flew his first F-15E sortie July 22, 2004, here as a member of the 333rd Fighter Squadron.

Swanson has accumulated more than 1,200 combat flying hours supporting multiple operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom, Noble Eagle and Inherent Resolve. Thank you for your service!

Colonel Pettus, 48 Fighter Wing Commander Fini Flight

A 492nd Fighter Squadron locker is prepared for U.S. Air Force Col. Evan Pettus, 48th Fighter Wing commander, prior to his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England July 9, 2018. As a new lieutenant, Pettus spent his first tour stationed with the 492nd at RAF Lakenheath. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

U.S. Air Force Col. Evan Pettus, 48th Fighter Wing commander, conducts pre-flight checks prior to his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England July 9, 2018. Pettus has flown combat missions in operations Northern Watch, Southern Watch, Allied Force, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

U.S. Air Force Col. Evan Pettus, 48th Fighter Wing commander, climbs into an F-15E Strike Eagle prior to his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England July 9, 2018. Pettus has acquired more than 2,500 flying hours in several aircraft during his military career. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

U.S. Air Force Col. Evan Pettus, 48th Fighter Wing commander, communicates with an Airman from the 492nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron during pre-flight checks for his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England July 9, 2018. Pettus has flown combat missions in operations Northern Watch, Southern Watch, Allied Force, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

U.S. Air Force Col. Evan Pettus, 48th Fighter Wing commander, conducts pre-flight checks for his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England July 9, 2018.Pettus has flown combat missions in operations Northern Watch, Southern Watch, Allied Force, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

An Airman from the 492nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron salutes U.S. Air Force Col. Evan Pettus, 48th Fighter Wing commander, as Pettus departs for his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England July 9, 2018. Pettus has acquired more than 2,500 flying hours in several aircraft during his military career. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

U.S. Air Force Col. Evan Pettus, the commander of the 48th Fighter Wing, taxis after his final flight in an F-15 Eagle aircraft at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England July 9, 2018. Pettus acquired more than 2,500 flying hours in several aircraft during his military career. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

U.S. Air Force Col. Evan Pettus, 48th Fighter Wing commander, receives a final salute from Liberty Wing Airman after his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England July 9, 2018. Pettus has acquired more than 2,500 flying hours in several aircraft during his military career. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

RAF eagle squadrons presented badges in London

ROYAL AIR FORCE LAKENHEATH, England —Badges for the Royal Air Force 121 and 133 eagle squadrons were presented at the RAF Club in London, England June 29.

The event was held in celebration of the RAF 100th anniversary and marks the date U.S. Army Air Corps Col. Charles Sweeney wrote to the U.K. Air Ministry proposing the formation of RAF fighter squadrons comprised of American volunteers in 1940.

“It’s a very special year,” RAF Air Vice Marshal Gerry Mayhew, Air Officer Commanding Number 1 Group said. “It’s the century mark for the Royal Air Force.”

Senior U.S. Air Force and RAF officers attended the event along with veterans, families and 121 Squadron RAF Air Cadets.
“I, as an American Airman, am incredibly proud to be involved in a ceremony to celebrate 100 years of the Royal Air Force,” said USAF Brig. Gen. Christopher Short, United States Senior Defense Official and Defense Attaché.

Three ‘eagle squadrons’ were formed between 1940 and 1941 from U.S. citizens who volunteered to serve in the RAF. Initially they had British commanding officers, a combination of U.S. and British pilots and British ground crew.

All three squadrons flew fighter patrols during the Dieppe Raid in 1942. Pilots from the squadrons served with RAF squadrons defending Malta, in the Desert Air Force in North Africa and with the RAF in the Far East during the war against Japan.

“If you think about, ‘Service before self,’ and giving up your citizenship to go serve a cause,” Short said. “It wasn’t just glamour, because you had to know that most of you wouldn’t make it home.”

Leadership from the 48th Operations Group at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England and the 4th Operations Group at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, attended as representatives of current “eagle” squadrons that fly F-15E Strike Eagles and F-15C Eagles.

When the U.S. entered World War II the three eagle squadrons, and the American pilots in them, transferred to the U.S. Army Air Forces, 8th Air Force, forming the 4th Fighter Group in 1942. Their proud heritage of service is carried on today by the 4th Fighter Wing. The 48th Fighter-Bomber Group, now the 48th Fighter Wing, flew aircraft in support of operations in Europe, including the Invasion of Normandy June 6, 1944.

A special badge, approved by King George VI in October 1940 was worn by the pilots – the spread eagle badge surmounted by the letters ‘E.S.’

The RAF 121 and 133 eagle squadron badges, worn by the pilots in the original eagle squadrons, will now be displayed at the RAF Club in their honor.

Personnel of No.121 (Eagle) Squadron look on as three Supermarine Spitfire aircraft land after a fighter sweep over northern France at Royal Air Force Rochford in Essex, England August 1942. Some of the accommodation used by the squadron is visible in the background, as are several civilian houses and two RAF vehicles. (Courtesy photo)

Three American pilots of the No. 71 (Eagle) Squadron Royal Air Force show off their new squadron badge at Church Fenton, Yorkshire, Oct. 1940. Three ‘eagle squadrons’ were formed between 1940 and 41 from U.S. citizens in the RAF. Initially they had British commanding officers, a combination of U.S. and British pilots and British ground crew. (Courtesy Photo)

Lt. Col. Matthew Swanson, 336th Fighter Squadron commander at Seymour-Johnson Air Force Base, Goldsboro, North Carolina, and Lt. Col. Isaac Bell, 335th FS commander at Seymour-Johnson AFB, for a photo during the eagle squadron ceremony at Royal Air Force Club in London, England, June 29. The RAF 121 and 133 eagle squadron badges, worn by the pilots in the original Eagle squadrons, will now be displayed at the RAF Club in their honor. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christopher S. Sparks)

U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Christopher Short, United States Senior Defense Official and Defense Attaché, speaks during the Eagle Squadron ceremony at Royal Air Force Club in London, England, June 29. The event was held in celebration of the RAF 100th anniversary and marks the date U.S. Army Air Corps Col. Charles Sweeney wrote to the U.K. Air Ministry proposing the formation of RAF fighter squadrons comprised of American volunteers in 1940. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christopher S. Sparks)

Royal Air Force Air Vice Marshal Gerry Mayhew, Air Officer Commanding Number 1 Group, speaks during the eagle squadron ceremony at Royal Air Force Club in London, England, June 29. A special badge, approved by King George VI in October 1940 was worn by the U.S. pilots while working with the RAF – the spread eagle badge surmounted by the letters ‘E.S.’ (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christopher S. Sparks)

48th Ops Group commander completes final flight

Col. Evan Pettus, 48th Fighter Wing commander, congratulates Col. Donn Yates, 48th Operations Group commander, upon completion of his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, June 1. Yates is expected to take command of the 4th Fighter Wing at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina this summer. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

Col. Donn Yates, 48th Operations Group commander, is greeted by his spouse after his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, June 1. Yates is expected to take command of the 4th Fighter Wing at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina this summer. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

Col. Donn Yates, 48th Operations Group commander, takes off for his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, June 1. Yates is expected to take command of the 4th Fighter Wing at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina this summer. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

Col. Donn Yates, 48th Operations Group commander, returns a salute from a 48th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Airman prior to his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, June 1. Yates is expected to take command of the 4th Fighter Wing at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina this summer. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

Col. Donn Yates, 48th Operations Group commander, and his weapon systems officer, run through their pre-flight systems checks for his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, June 1. Yates is expected to take command of the 4th Fighter Wing at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina this summer. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

Col. Donn Yates, 48th Operations Group commander, returns a salute from a 48th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Airman prior to his final flight at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, June 1. Yates is expected to take command of the 4th Fighter Wing at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina this summer.

Eagles surge at RAF Lakenheath

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron flies over Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, May 23, 2018. An array of avionics and electronics systems gives the F-15E the capability to fight at low altitude, day or night, and in all weather. ( U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

An F-15C Eagle assigned to the 493rd Fighter Squadron takes off at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, during Exercise POINTBLANK May 24, 2018. The objective for this iteration is to prepare Coalition warfighters, consisting of 10 F-15E Strike Eagles, 10 F-15C Eagles from the Liberty Wing and four RAF Eurofighter Typhoons for a highly contested fight against near-peer adversaries by providing a multi-dimensional battle-space to conduct advanced training in support of U.S. and U.K. national interests. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron flies over Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, May 23, 2018. The 492nd FS trains regularly to ensure RAF Lakenheath brings unique air combat capabilities to the fight. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron lands at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, May 23, 2018. The F-15’s superior maneuverability and acceleration are achieved through its high engine thrust-to-weight ratio and low-wing loading. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Malcolm Mayfield)

Chiefs take off for Razor Talon

Capt. Bowman (right), 335th Fighter Squadron pilot, and 1st Lt. Kaiser, 335th FS weapon systems officer, check over the maintenance log of an F-15E Strike Eagle during exercise Razor Talon, May 11, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly, large-force training exercise for joint East Coast tactical and support aviation units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

Two Airmen from the 372nd Training Squadron, Detachment 1, marshal an F-15E Strike Eagle during exercise Razor Talon, May 11, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. This monthly, large-force training exercise, gives service members unique opportunities to combine land, air and sea forces from all service branches in realistic training environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

An F-15E Strike Eagle takes off during exercise Razor Talon, May 11, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly, large-force training exercise for joint East Coast tactical and support aviation units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

492 Fighter Squadron at INIOHOS 18

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England takes off from Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. The 492nd FS is flying alongside Hellenic Air Force airmen and other partners and Allies during the exercise to increase interoperability and strengthen partnerships. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

Two F-15E Strike Eagles assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England approach the runway at Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. Thirteen 492nd FS F-15Es are participating in the Hellenic Air Force-led multinational exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England flies over Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. INIOHOS 18 is a Hellenic Air Force-led, large force flying exercise focused on strengthening partnerships and interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England takes off from Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. The 492nd FS is flying alongside Hellenic Air Force airmen and other partners and Allies during the exercise to increase interoperability and strengthen partnerships. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England prepares to land at Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. Seventy-six fighter aircraft are participating in this years’ iteration of the exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

Two F-15E Strike Eagles assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England taxis at Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. Thirteen 492nd Fighter Squadron F-15Es are participating in the Hellenic Air Force-led multinational exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

An F-15E Strike Eagle assigned to the 492nd Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England taxis at Andravida Air Base, Greece, March 21, 2018, during exercise INIOHOS 18. INIOHOS 18 is a Hellenic Air Force-led, large force flying exercise focused on strengthening partnerships and interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo/1st Lt. Elias Small)

F-15 Training Mission at Klamath Falls

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Eric Haas, 173rd Fighter Wing F-15 pilot, steps to the flightline in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

U.S. Air Force F-15C maintainers prepare the jets for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

An F-15C student pilot, starts up the engines of an F-15 Eagle in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

U.S. Air Force F-15C pilots preflight their aircraft in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

An F-15 crew chief signals the pilot that chalks had been pulled on the tires in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C student pilot steps to the flightline in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

An F-15 crew chief stands at parade rest as the pilot continues his preflight checks in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

A U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagle taxis to the runway in prepration for a routine training mission at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon April 20, 2018. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15C training base for the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Jennifer Shirar)

335th FS takes off for Razor Talon

By Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes, 4th Fighter Wing Public Affairs / Published April 06, 2018

1st Lts. Jacob Del Ponte (left), 336th Fighter Squadron pilot, and Shane O’Connell, 335th Fighter Squadron weapon systems officer, check the maintenance log of an F-15E Strike Eagle prior to take off for Razor Talon, April 6, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly, large-force training exercise for joint East Coast tactical and support aviation units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

Airman Justin Fralick, 4th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, completes final checks before launching an F-15E Strike Eagle for Razor Talon, April 6, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. This monthly, large-force training exercise, gives service members unique opportunities to combine land, air and sea forces from all service branches in realistic training environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

An F-15E Strike Eagle from the 335th Fighter Squadron takes off to participate in Razor Talon, April 6, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly low-cost, large-force training exercise for joint East Coast tactical and support aviation units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

An F-15E Strike Eagle takes off to participate in Razor Talon while another F-15E taxis down the runway, April 6, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly, large-force training exercise for joint East Coast tactical and support aviation units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

Two F-15E Strike Eagles from the 335th Fighter Squadron taxi down the runway to participate in Razor Talon, April 6, 2018, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. Razor Talon is a monthly large-force training exercise that involves friendly forces fighting through contested airspace while destroying air-to-air and air-to-ground simulated threats along the North Carolina cost and Mid-Atlantic region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shawna L. Keyes)

391st FS participates in Combat Archer, Hammer

By Staff Sgt. Jeremy L. Mosier, 366th Fighter Wing Public Affairs / Published April 03, 2018

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho — The 391st Fighter Squadron departed for Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, to participate in Combat Archer and Hammer March 25, 2018.

Amn Tasha Trainor, 391st Aircraft Maintenance Unit crew chief, parks an F-15E Strike Eagle April 2, 2018 at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. Exercise Combat Archer and Hammer provide an opportunity to evaluate a unit’s capability to employ a variety of weapon systems throughout all stages of the process, from storage and preparation, to use on target. (Staff Sgt. Jeremy L. Mosier)

391st Fighter Squadron members perform a FOD walk before take-offs at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, April 3, 2018. The 391st FS participated in exercises Combat Archer and Hammer. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt Jeremy L. Mosier)

These exercises provide aircrew and maintainers from the 366th Fighter Wing an opportunity to evaluate their ability to employ a variety weapons systems throughout all stages of the process.

“Exercises like Combat Archer and Hammer give us an idea of how a missile performs,” said Capt. Zachary Zimmerman, 391st Fighter Squadron flight commander. “Also, they help build confidence in the weapon system and the aircraft itself, so when a munition comes off a jet in combat we know exactly how it is going to perform.”

During these exercises units improve efficiency of deploying a variety of munitions, to include the AIM9X.

A 391st Fighter Squadron F-15E Strike Eagle takes off from Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, during Combat Archer and Hammer April 2, 2018. Exercises Combat Archer and Hammer provide aircrew and maintainers the opportunity to evaluate their ability to employ a variety of different munitions. (Staff Sgt. Jeremy L. Mosier)

Although aircrew and maintainers work with the loading and employing of munitions at home station, Combat Archer and Hammer provide the opportunity to work with larger quantities of live munitions in a short period of time.

“These exercises allow us to evaluate our complete kill chain of a weapon system,” said Lt. Col. Robert Olvis, 391st Fighter Squadron commander. “Being able to go from our munitions troops who build the weapons, to the maintainers who load the weapons, to testing the actual combat system itself to include the aviators who go out and employ those weapons.”